Gabrielle Ray

'Gabrielle Ray said, 'I am always dancing; I love it! When I don't dance, I sing. What else is there to do?'

Emmy Wehlen – The Merry Widow – The Sketch – Wednesday 31st March 1909

MADE A MERRY WIDOW BY THE “FLU.”: MISS EMMY WEHLEN, WHO IS PLAYING SONIA AT DALY’S.

When last we published some portraits of Miss Wehlen it was uncertain when Londoners would see her. The uncertainty no longer exists, for the young actress is playing Sonia, Miss Lily Elsie’s part, in “The Merry Widow,” at Daly’s. Miss Elsie is out of the cast for a fortnight, that she may have opportunity to recover from a sharp attack of “flu,” and Miss Wehlen is appearing in her stead for that time. On Miss Elsie’s return Miss Wehlen will understudy her. The new Merry Widow was born at Mannheim, has acted with much success in musical plays at Munich and other places on the Continent, and made her greatest “hit” as a comedienne in “Mitternachtsmadchen.” In five months she has learned to speak English well.

 

The Sketch – Wednesday 31st March 1909

 

 

 

Emmy Wehlen – c1910

April 6, 2021 Posted by | Actress, Daly's Theatre, Gabrielle Ray, Lily Elsie, Social History, The Merry Widow, The Sketch, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Dollar Princess – 1909

 

 

The Dollar Princess is a musical in three acts by A.M. Willner and Fritz Grünbaum , adapted into English by Basil Hood (from the 1907 Die Dollarprinzessin),

with music by Leo Fall and lyrics by Adrian Ross. It opened in London at Daly’s Theatre on 25 September 1909, running for 428 performances.

 British Musical Theatre

I wouldn’t normally buy a musical score but the cover looked amazing and Miss Ray is shown in the cast as Daisy

March 5, 2021 Posted by | Actress, Daly's Theatre, Gabrielle Ray, Lily Elsie, Social History, The Dollar Princess, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Daisy Irving – The Merry Widow – The Tatler – Wednesday 10th July 1907

The Talk of the Town

 

PRINCE DANILO (MR. JOSEPH COYNE) AND SONIA (MISS LILY ELSIE) DANCING THE MUCH-TALKED-OF WALTZ

This scene, the most important of the second act, sees the delightful waltz which from the first performance has evoked scenes of extraordinary enthusiasm on the part of the audience

 

BARON POPOFF (MR. GEORGE GRAVES) TELLS A FUNNY STORY

 

Mr. Graves’s sayings throughout the piece are irresistible and evoke roars of laughter.

Seated on his right are: Frou-Frou (Miss Daisie Irving), Margot (Miss Margot Erskine),

To-To (Miss Mabel Munroe), and on his left Jou-Jou (Miss Dolly Dombey)

 

In “The Merry Widow” Mr. George Edwardes has found a comic opera which will fill Daly’s Theatre for many months to come. In every way in music, in lyrics, in acting a genuine success has been found, and it is hard to say to whom should he awarded the honours of the occasion. Never have the famous band of drolls Mr. Joseph Coyne, Mr. George Graves, Mr. W. H. Berry, and Mr. Fred Kaye acted better, and if only for the introduction of Miss Lily Elsie is Mr. Edwardes to be cordially thanked for “The Merry Widow.”

The whole town is now ringing with the haunting strains of the beautiful dance in the second act of “The Merry Widow,” charmingly interpreted by Mr. Coyne and Miss Elsie, and the music which has delighted a continent is giving equal delight here. In M. Franz Lehar is the true successor to Offenbach, and it is to be hoped that London will soon see further examples of his true musical talent. A word is due to our contributor, Mr. Adrian Ross, for his very pleasing lyrics for this most successful piece.

 

SCENE FROM ACT III. – SONIA TO THE PRINCE: “I LOVE YOU I I LOVE YOU!  I’VE ALWAYS LOVED YOU!”

 

The names of the characters, reading from left to right, are: Nisch, messenger to the legation (Mr. W. H. Berry); Sylvaine (Miss Irene Desmond);

M. de St. Brioche Mr. Gordon Cleather); Natalie, wife of Baron Popoff (Miss Elizabeth Firth); Baron Popoff (Mr. George Graves); Prince Danilo (Mr. Joseph Coyne);

Sonia (Miss Lily Elsie); General Novikovich (Mr. Fred Kaye); Olga, wife of Novikovich (Miss Nina Sevening)

M. Khadja (Mr.V. 0’Conncor and the Marquis de Cascada (Mr. Lennox Pawle)

 

The Tatler – Wednesday 10th July 1907

 

Daisy Irving – The Tatler – Wednesday 24th July 1907

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Gabrielle Ray – Oval Beauties Rare – The Daily Mirror – Tuesday 29th August 1911

OVAL BEAUTIES RARE

Round Face Becoming the Type of English Loveliness.

ARTISTIC OBJECTION.

 

There are signs that efforts are being made to establish the “round” face as the true type of English beauty and to condemn the “oval” face, which has for generations been the inspiration of poets and painters alike.

The leaders of the campaign in favour of the round face, according to a well-known male novelist, are to be found chiefly in the ranks of the women novelists, who invariably make their heroines round-faced and describe them as “sweetly pretty” and as preserving “a girlish charm.”

In the course of a letter to The Daily Mirror attacking this new cult, the author, with some temerity, gives a list of popular musical comedy favourites, who represent, he says, the apotheosis of the round-face type.

 

ROUND-FACE TYPE.

The following list – in the order of the popularity of their photographs – of ladies of the stage of the round-face type was supplied yesterday to The Daily Mirror by a prominent photographer of London actresses:-

  1. Lily Elsie.
  2. Gabrielle Ray.
  3. Gertie Millar.
  4. Lily Brayton.
  5. Constance Collier.
  6. Marie Studholme.
  7. Tessie Hackney.
  8. Norah Kerin.

“I grant,” writes the novelist, “that they are pretty, winsome, attractive and charming, but they are not beautiful in the sense that the old masters regarded beauty nor as the leading modern artists regard it either.

“The truth of the matter is that round faces are becoming more and more common in Great Britain, and they are now in such a great majority that they are able to take up and popularise the fashions of dress, millinery or hairdressing that best suit their own type of beauty, and the rare oval-faced beauties are forced by fashion to follow them, greatly to their own disadvantage.

“Modern hats, modern hairdressing and modern clothes are all in favour of the round-faced girl, and she has won thereby a purely fictitious reputation for beauty.”

Miss Ivy Lilian Close, adjudged in The Daily Mirror beauty competition to be the most beautiful woman in England, is a striking example, however, of the English admiration for the round-face type.

America, on the other hand, still clings to the oval face type of beauty, the artistic type, the type beloved of the old masters, as is instanced in the case of Miss Katherine Frey, judged to be the most beautiful woman in America.

 

ACTRESSES OF OVAL FACE TYPE.

 “La Gioconda” is yet again another instance of admiration for the long-recognised type of beautiful face – the oval, delicate, finely-chiselled and spirituelle features always given by painters to beautiful women of other days.

That this type of face still has its admirers in England was also instanced by the same photographer who supplied another list of actresses of the oval-face type, the names, as before, being given in the order of the popularity of their photographs:-

  1. Phyllis Dare,
  2. Julia Neilson.
  3. Neilson Terry.
  4. Pearl Aufrere.
  5. Marie Wilson.
  6. Gaby Deslys.
  7. Evelyn Millard.
  8. Grace Lane.

Mr. George Henry, A.R.A., told The Daily Mirror yesterday that the delicate oval face is still the recognised type of beauty in artists’ studios.

“It was also the recognised type in Japan when I was there some years ago,” he said, “and although I only saw two women who possessed the true oval face, all the round-faced women insisted upon their pictures being painted as if they were of the oval type of beauty.”

 

The Daily Mirror – Tuesday 29th August 1911

 

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Gabrielle Ray – Life Off the Stage – The Weekly Dispatch (London) – Sunday 26th May 1912

LAST NIGHT’S THEATRICAL GOSSIP.

Life Off the Stage.

It is curious how quickly the public gives up talking about well-known people once they retire, temporarily or otherwise, from the occupation that has brought them into prominence. One never hears a word of Gabrielle Ray now that she married and gone away, and people have ceased inquiring when Miss Lily Elsie will return to the stage. I would not be in the least surprised if both those Daly’s Theatre actresses found life away from the stage so pleasant that they will never return to the theatre unless as spectators. They would only be following the example of Miss Edna May, who loves the theatre; “but as for acting, no, no, never again, on any terms.” And yet she looks wonderfully pretty now.

 

The Weekly Dispatch (London) – Sunday 26th May 1912

January 27, 2021 Posted by | Actress, Biography, Gabrielle Ray, Lily Elsie, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gabrielle Ray – The Dollar Princess – The Evening News (London) – Monday 27th September 1909

I’m constantly looking through the News Archive for snippets about Miss Ray and the piece below came up, what was interesting was the descriptions of the costumes worn by Lily Elsie, Emmy Wehlen and Miss Ray. Often there aren’t any illustration to accompany the piece but this had two, checking my collection I found two, one of Lily Elsie and one of Miss Ray that correspond with the descriptions, Emmy Wehlen I didn’t have any as she isn’t someone who’s cards I collect. I have added the images below along with the article.

WOMAN’S WORLD

STAGE DRESSES IN THE “DOLLAR PRINCESS.”

BEAUTIFUL GOWNS WORN BY MISS LILY ELSIE AND MISS EMMY WEHLEN.

 

Brilliant schemes of colour allied to the fascinating modes of today may be said to be the leading notes struck by the wonderful display of dress in Mr. George Edwardes’s new production, “The Dollar Princess,” at Daly’s Theatre. As usual, Miss Lily Elsie presents a series of the most lovely stage pictures in her character of the Dollar Princess, and the colours and fashion of her gowns accentuate the alluring charm of her own personality.

A Scheme of White, Blue, and Pink.

White, pale blue and pale pink have always been the three hues chosen as the fitting background of a pink and white skin, blue eves and golden brown hair, and it is noticeable that this charming trio appear in some form in every dress worn by Miss Lily Elsie. In the first act, this popular actress presents the striking silhouette demanded by the mode of the moment, and materialised in a straight tunic of soft white silk, slashed open at either side over it narrow scant underdress, and caught together by broad pocket-like plaques of Wedgwood blue silk embroidered in white.

The Piquant Tennis Dress.

Again the note of blue is struck in the wonderful tennis frock worn in the second act. The laveuse tunic of softest blue silk is turned up in the correct manner over an ethereal underdress of white de mouseeline de soir with entredeux of lace posed above draperies of palest pink chiffon, which give a lovely tint to the muslin. Very piquant is the fashion in which the tunic at the back is formed into a very fascinating sash drapery fringed deeply at the end. A corsage bouquet of pink roses and a most fascinating cabriolet hat of shot-blue satin with narrow velvet strings framing the pretty face and a knot of pink roses nestling at the left side still further carry out this colour scheme of pale-blue and pink.

A Gown of Dazzling Glitter.

Brilliantly scintillating is Miss Lily Elsie’s second gown in the same act, composed as it is of an exquisitely lovely underdress of soft lace, festooned with trails of button pink roses and horizontal bands of pale blue ribbon, worn beneath a glittering fringed stole of diamante chiffon and a long tunic of the like fabric. Draped from both arms and suspended partially from the shoulders is a lovely scarf of pink chiffon fringed with crystal and paste drops. The whole affect is one of dazzling beauty, and successfully conveys the sense and atmosphere of a multi-millionaire princess.

Wedgwood Blue Straw and Blue Roses.

The last act reveals Miss Lily Elsie in a long motor coat of white cloth with roll revers of white silk and a piquant bonnet of Wedgwood blue straw trimmed with a knot of pink roses. The coat is worn above a striking dress, showing the modish cuirass bodice of palest pink mousseline de sole, with a flounce of soft silk and revealing beneath the cuirass a broad band of pale-blue silk, which trims the underdress of chiffon. Again a graceful chiffon scarf of palest pink is knotted round the arms, giving another charming note to this pretty frock.

Pervenche Chiffon Velvet.

Very striking, also, are the gowns worn by Miss Emmy Wehlen. The first dress, of pervenche chiffon velvet, with its sash drapery arranged just below the knees and it’s guimpe of pervenche embroidered lace, is worn with a becoming hat of pervenche satin, trimmed with lovely beige-coloured plumes. In the tennis scene Miss Wehlen first appears in a tunic of pale blue chiffon garlanded with pink roses over a soft blue silk tunic, and a large white feather toque. This is exchanged for a most fascinating evening gown of white silk, with the corsage and panel embroidered in coral and gold, and a most effective touch is given by the striking draperies of black and silver tulle caught in from the shoulders to the arms, and matching the black and silver scarf swathed round the coiffure.

A Picturesque Evening Cloak.

Everyone will admire the picturesquely draped olive green velvet cloak trimmed with gold ornaments worn in the same scene by Miss Wehlen above an exquisitely fitting frock of palest grey-green satin charmeuse with a hint of pink. No will Miss Gabrielle Ray’s coat of pink satin be forgotten, worn above a white chiffon petticoat trimmed with medallion shaped ruches encircling Empire baskets of chiffon roses, and accompanied by the most fascinating Revolution bonnet of gold coloured straw trimmed with a tiny wreath of roses for which a net is substituted afterwards.

The Evening News (London) – Monday 27th September 1909

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Mrs Basil Loder – Lily Elsie – The Tatler – Wednesday 16th May 1917

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Amy Webster – The Merry Widow – The London Daily News – Tuesday 11th June 1907

 

DALY’S THEATRE

 THIS EVENING at 8.30. THE MERRY WIDOW

 

Messrs Robert Evett, W H. Barry, Lennox Pawle, Gordon Cleather, Fred Kaye, V. O’Connor, R. Roberts and Joseph Coyne and George Graves;

Misses Elizabeth Firth, Nina Sevening, Irene Desmond, K Welch, A Webster, D. Dunbar, D. Dombey, D. Irving, P. le Grand, M. Munroe, M. Erskine, G. Lester, M. Russell and Lily Elsie.

 

The London Daily News – Tuesday 11th June 1907

 

August 24, 2020 Posted by | Actress, Amy Webster, Gabrielle Ray, Lily Elsie, Social History, The Merry Widow, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gabrielle Ray – See See – The Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News – Saturday 7th July 1906

 

 

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Gabrielle Ray – All Fools’ Day Revel – The Sporting Times – Saturday 4th April 1914

 

ROUND THE TOWN.

 I looked in at the All Fools’ Day Revel at Covent Garden on Wednesday night, but, truth to tell, though it was very full, the proceedings were not particularly hilarious. In fact, the majority the participants wore a worried look, suggestive of unpaid rent, and obtrusive tax collectors. Well known people were scarce, but I caught a glimpse of Marie Lohr dancing energetically; Gabrielle Ray, otherwise Mrs. Eric Loder, in very natty sailor boy’s costume; Lily Elsie, who hardly left her box; while the men, Sir “Romeo” Stuart was here, there, and everywhere, and a young Guardsman of my acquaintance was very resplendent in the uniform his grandfather wore at Waterloo.

The Sporting Times – Saturday 4th April 1914

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