Gabrielle Ray

'Gabrielle Ray said, 'I am always dancing; I love it! When I don't dance, I sing. What else is there to do?'

The Orchid (Rotary 4328 H)

 

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August 23, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Autograph, Deltiology, Gabrielle Ray, Rotary, Social History, The Orchid, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Toreador – The Irish Daily Independent and Nation – Monday July 20th 1903

“THE TOREADOR.”

 Mr. George Edwardes’ original London Gaiety Company in “The Toreador,” is the attraction at the Dublin Gaiety Theatre during this week. The entire production has been transferred direct from London, including scenery, dresses, effects, etc. Mr. Edwardes has gone to enormous expense in carrying out this engagement. “The Toreador” finished its successful career on July 4th, and with it the “Old Gaiety.” The London Gaiety was opened by Mr. John Hollingshead on December 21st 1868, with a triple bill, made up of the operetta, “The Two Harlequins,”  Alfred Thompson’s adaptation of “L’Escamoteur,” “On the Cards,” and W. S. Gilbert’s operatic extravaganza, “Robert the Devil.” But three decades and a half have passed, and we already come to the final performance within a theatre whose varied policy and productions have been as much discussed as those of any playhouse in London.

For the last night of the “Old Gaiety” Mr. Edwards received over 20,000 applications for seats in the Pit and Gallery alone. Nearly every actor and actress of note has appeared et the London Gaiety at some time or other. Ada Cavendish, Samuel Phelps, Charles Matthews, John Ryder, George Conquest, Arthur Ceril, Sims Reeves, all appeared at the Gaiety in those early Hollingshead days. A good deal further down the fatal roll come the names of Fred Leslie, Kate Vaughan, E. J. Tounen, W. Elton, David James, Erneanx Cook, Tillie Belmore, Charles Harris, Meyer Lutz. In addition to “The Toreador” will be played “The Linkman,” or Gaiety Memories, which is a review of past Gaiety successes. All the most popular songs are introduced, and the old favourites impersonated by present-day artistes.

The company include Mr. Fred Wright, jun; Mr. Lionel Markinder, Mr. George Grosmith, jun; Mr. Robert Vainby, Mr. Harry Grattan, Mr. Herbert Clayton, Mr. Arthur Hatherton, and Mr. Edmund Payne. Amongst the ladies are Miss Connie Ediss, Miss Violet Lloyd, Miss Florence Allen, Miss Hilda Jacobsen, Miss Adrienne Augarde, Miss Gabrielle Ray. A remarkably handsome souvenir will be given away on Friday night. The production is in the capable hands of Mr. A. E. Dodson. The orchestra has been specially augmented, and will be under the direction of Mr. Jacques Greebe.

The Irish Daily Independent and Nation, Monday, July 20th 1903

August 21, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, The Gaiety Theatre, The Linkman, The Toreador, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gabrielle Ray – The Casino Girl – Brighton Gazette, Hove Post, Sussex & Surrey Telegraph – Thursday 31st July 1902

THE THEATRE ROYAL.

“The Casino Girl” is quite as fascinating as her many prototypes, and her second visit to the Theatre Royal this week finds her more popular than before. The Ben Greet Company contains many other girls besides the vivacious French milliner of the title role, and the chief characteristics of the musical comedy are pretty dances and faces, and handsome costumes. These, together with the irresistible humour of Mr J. E. Sullivan as Pilsener Pasha – his original part at the Shaftesbury Theatre – are the chief factors in the success of the play. Mr Ludwig Englander’s music contains a good many catchy selections, including a spirited Sousa parody, the topical song “it’s a habit they’ve got,” and a couple of sentimental items, all of which fetched double encores on Monday night. Miss Maud Darling is excellent in the title role as Laura lee, an ex-Casino actress, with a tricky French style and a pleasant voice. She was repeatedly encored for her singing and dancing, and the song, “I love my boy,” followed by a graceful dance, was a very popular item. Mr Sullivan’s fund of humour is quite irresistible. Those who saw him as the “polite lunatic” in “The Belle of New York” will know that he has an original vein of humour, upon which his part as the eccentric Pasha makes great demands. He was, however, quite equal to the occasion, and it was impossible to keep a straight face with him on the stage. He had a strong supporter in Mr Eardley Turner as the picturesque vagabond Gaggs. Mr Turner is a character actor of conspicuous ability, and made the most of a genuinely funny part. His rendering of the humorous song, “Same old story; nothing new,” was quite one of the features of the performance, and met with an enthusiastic reception. The comic element is also well sustained by Mr Stanley White and Mr O. E. Lemmon, as Ben Muley, the chief of a gang of thieves and his lieutenant respectively. The couple are excellent dancers, and Mr Lemmon’s acrobatic eccentricities afforded a great deal of amusement. Then Miss Madge Cleaver as Mrs H. Malaprop Rocks, the elderly American whose knowledge of the language is elementary and remarkable, is responsible for a good many hearty laughs. An attractive dancer and vocalist is Miss Gabrielle Ray, who as Dolly Twinkle, the leading artiste of Gaggs opera company, introduced some very popular items, and was frequently encored. Miss A. Poole was also very fascinating as Lotta Rocks, and is a dainty little dancer. The only sentimental part is in the hands of Mr Walter Balfour, a Young English doctor in love with the Casino Girl. He has a very fine voice, and his solo, “I love my love in the springtime,” was admirably rendered, but he never seemed quite at home in his acting. The chorus is particularly strong and well dressed, and many charming stage pictures are seen. On Monday night the audience were most enthusiastic, and with the exception of one or two periods in which the play drags a little “The Casino Girl” is exceedingly bright and attractive.

There is to be a Matinee performance to-day (Thursday) at 2 p.m.

Brighton Gazette, Hove Post, Sussex & Surrey Telegraph – Thursday 31st July 1902

August 19, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, The Casino Girl, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Gaiety Theatre – The Tatler – Wednesday 5th August 1903

THE BEGINNING OF THE END

The fittings of the Gaiety were sold off last Wednesday prior to the (curiously named) “housebreaker” starting the art of demolition. That part of the building which used to house the restaurant has already been destroyed.

 

GAIETY STARS: HOW THEY USED TO TWINKLE

By One of Them, Miss Emily Soldene.

 

[Miss Emily Soldene has many reminiscences of the Gaiety. It is interesting to note that she has in a round about way kept up her connection with the famous house, for her niece, Miss Katie Vesey, has danced there a good deal. Miss Soldene now lives permanently in London, where she practises the gentle art of journalism on behalf of an Australian newspaper. A witty woman, she has written the most amusing autobiography a player has ever given us.]

“A prima donna in the pit,” said the Daily Mail on the Monday following the last night of the good old Gaiety. Quite right; I was the prima donna in the pit and had no end of a time with The Linkman. What memories of charming artists, of adorable and applauding audiences, of all the rush and fuss – the adulation, the devotion, the breathless wonder, the absolute personal exaltation that comes with the certainty of success. This revue brought people and things back so vividly, for I, too, had played my part in this theatre, and the recollection of those times filled my remembering eyes – with tears? Oh no! with a sort of dimness, a – well, you know. What bevies of beauty have beamed from the Gaiety stage. Selina Dolaro – dark, piquant, Spanish, languorous, “delightful Dolly.” I see her now, the princess in Fleur de Lys (the first work of Leo Delibes produced in England), wearing a closely-clinging robe of white silken damask with interwoven golden lilies of France, a train of cloudy diaphanous tulle, down one side of which fell a shower of water lilies.

Clara Vesey in Genevieve de Brabant – blue-eyed, long-lashed Clara Vesey, the rage of the town, the toast of the clubs, the perfectly-figured pet page to H.S.H. the Duke of Brabant, the ineffable grace, disdain, impertinence, and blasé exhaustion of her “Your highness, the dinner waits,” being worth all the money and Miss Annie Sinclair, our first Clairette in Madame Angot – how pretty, delicate, and demure she was.

Then Kate Vaughan, a vision of dainty beauty in some burlesque, I forget the name – Alice in Dick Whittington I fancy – wearing a short white satin dress trimmed with white lilac, a large muff of white lilac, an early Victorian bonnet of white lilac, and her bodice fitting like the paper on the wall.

These were the first days of the famous “corset” bodice, introduced by the ladies of the French company playing at that time L’ Etrangere at the Queen’s Theatre, Long Acre. The new bodice was of inestimable value to the willowy, graceful, and from head-to-heel uneventful beauties. Missing curves were introduced, angles were rounded, and everybody – at least every feminine body wondered “how it was done.” The corset was padded the lady walked in at the back – was laced up tightly, and there you are. Do you remember “Lardy” Wilson the magnificent, the beauteous Egertons, the delightful Love, the petite this, the saucy that, the pages in Chilperic, the maids of honour in Genevieve? Splendid, all picked girls, and making the best of their opportunities. (Of course, I am speaking from an artistic point.) How beautiful and busy they looked in the boudoir of the duchess sewing mysterious tiny garments for an expected addition to the ducal household. What airs and graces, what flouting of poor mere men – girls not so plentiful in those days, scarcely enough to go round, girls rather at a premium.

What eyes! Blue eyes, grey eyes, amethyst eyes, flashing eyes, soft brown eyes, bright hazel eyes, defiant eyes, appealing eyes, but all the lashes black – part of the contract, you know. I have heard people remark they thought the girls sometimes glanced at the johnnies in the stalls. I don’t believe it, do you?

Talking of johnnies in the stalls, we used to have visitors behind the scenes now and then. Patricians, peers, patrons, not to mention personages. Nothing frivolous. Oh no. Potent, grave, and reverend signors; that sort of thing you know. Among them came a most noble marquis – a charming person, and so thoughtful. One had only to shiver at night to receive an Indian shawl next morning. Then the gloves were always made to order. And the handkerchiefs, real Valenciennes, and the jeweller’s young man came down from Bond Street in a cab bringing big cases to “choose from.”

His lordship was a devotee of that poetical and perfect form of married life which decrees that one should not see too much of the other. He was broad-shouldered, broad-minded, and would murmur, “Shall not get in before the second act to-morrow. I dine with my lady; she is a great astronomer you know, and will only receive me one evening in the week.”

Not but what this sort of thing may be carried too far. I have heard of the head of a household being described by his butler (of the Admirable Crichton type) as “the gentleman who dines with us on Sundays.”

Then among our visitors was a society doctor – very handy at times. He always carried a flask of fine brown sherry in his breast pocket. Brown sherry was fashionable in those days – amontillado being my particular.

Funny things happened sometimes. At a Gaiety matinee during the Phelps season – I think the play was Richelieu; anyway it was at the time of the American Revivalists – in a front scene, one of the characters pointing off “o.p.” said, “He comes – he is moody.” “Where’s Sankey?” said a voice from the gallery – which broke the audience all up and spoilt the cardinal’s entrance. Somewhere about this time occurred the apotheosis of Sara – the high-kicker who used to dust the floor with her back hair. She did not dance during my engagements at the Gaiety, the theatre having too fine a sense of propriety to admit the interpolation of such a startling number as “Wiry Sal.” At the dress rehearsal of Madame Angot tempo 1873, a great strike among the gentle men of the chorus – it being decreed that the sartorial exigencies called for white wigs, and wearers of white wigs must of necessity be clean-shaven. Quite a riot in the theatre. The ladies of the chorus were furious “kicked” at such a sacrilegious idea and were prepared to go to any length in defence of these hirsute and admired adornments. One with tears in her eyes cried, “I’d rather throw up my engagement than my William should lose his moustaches.”

Autre temps, autre moeurs; moustaches are at a discount and legs have gone out of fashion. Positively the retrospective and redivivus ladies in tights presented by The Linkman gave me a shiver. How different are the massaged, manicured, frilled- furbelowed, voluminously-flounced chiffon- clad houris of the present to the simple sealskin brigade of the past. In those days of light and leading the less one had on the better, and polished nails were an accident.

Well, here’s to the “Gaiety girl of the present,” and though rather a “’orty” and petted young person long may she reign and have as good times as the “Gaiety girl of the past.”

 EMILY SOLDENE.

The Tatler – Wednesday 5th August 1903

A “tip-up seat.” For me it was a throne,

Whereon I took my place as king, with zest,

For whom the stars would twinkle, and the jest

Was blown.

An easy throne– the nimble ten-and-six

Gave me, how many times, the right to reign

And take the ready gift of Joy from Payne

(Or Hicks).

Seats that have heard such cheers from roof to stall,

Gaunt relics of the merrymaker’s feast,

I wonder what your fate. Perchance some

East- end hall.

Soon will the rain and every wayward wind

Sweep o’er the boards where sunny scenes were set

For poor Kate Vaughan and Sylvia Grey, and Letty Lind.

A JINGLE BY J. M. B.

August 19, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, The Gaiety Theatre, The Linkman, The Tatler, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gabrielle Ray (J. Beagles 814 A)

Gabrielle Ray (Rapid 2118)

August 18, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Deltiology, Gabrielle Ray, J. Beagles, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gabrielle Ray – Betty – The Tatler – Wednesday 10th November 1915

Wonderful Gertie and Graceful “Gabs.”

Only the best of the species remain – Gertie Millar at the Palace and now Gabrielle Ray in Betty at Daly’s. Gertie Millar has not cultivated the “flashing” manner of review, but she has perfected the daintier one of musical-comedy, and the contrast between, say, Teddie Gerard and herself is piquant. Gabrielle Ray has returned far more vital and “alive” than when she went away. She puts into her work a flair and a “go” which was never there in her former Gaiety days. And, if anything, she is more bewitching to look at than ever! In the dainty, rather meaningless, dancing of musical-comedy she is still unapproached. Altogether her art has taken a new lease of life, and Betty will certainly profit by her coming. Lauri de Frece, in the part left vacant by the departure of W. H. Berry to the Adelphi, is not yet as funny as his predecessor, but, given time, he will certainly prove his worth. He is one of the few comedians who, what- ever part they play, are always artists, never simply buffoons.

The Tatler – Wednesday 10th November 1915

August 17, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Betty, Daly's Theatre, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, The Tatler, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Bessie Ray – Aladdin – The Daily Telegraph & Courier (London) – Monday 26th December 1898

DALSTON.

“ALADDIN.”

 

In point of age the new and exceedingly comfortable theatre at Dalston is a very baby among metropolitan playhouses, for it is only some six months old. Hitherto it has been, so to speak, in leading strings, for its plays have been derived mainly from the successes of the leading London theatres. But now it has begun to run alone, and the new and original pantomime “Aladdin; or, the Naughty Young Scamp who ran off with the Lamp,” it made on Christmas Eve its first step. And firm and promising first step it was. The piece is written by Mr. Stanley Rogers, but as acted the author would probably fail recognise his own handiwork. It is worth while to get the printed play in order to secure a sort of supplementary entertainment, for there is little in the book that is heard on the stage and little that is done on the stage which is to be found in the book. Yet the performance is none the worse for that. It is a go-as-you-please affair, in which every actor seems to do what he likes, and, it must be admitted, does it well. There is very little Aladdin pure and simple in the pantomime. If analysed in chemical fashion the piece would be found to be compounded of many parts of variety show, comic business, and music-hall song and dance, with just a “trace” of the Hero of the Lamp. But it is capital entertainment nevertheless. Its predominating element is fun – good, hearty, boisterous, knock-about fun, that provokes shouts, peals, screams, and yells of laughter from first to last. There is hardly a moment when the audience is not exploding and roaring with merriment, excited by some delicious piece of nonsense and absurdity. Another strong element of the pantomime is its music. Of this there is plenty—any quantity of rollicking comic songs and melodious ballads -while the orchestra, under the baton Mr. E. T. de Bansie, does its work most excellently. Yet another feature of the play is its exquisite and dainty dancing, and when to all this are added well-painted and scenery and superb and tasteful dresses and general good all-round performance by the clever actors and actresses engaged, it will not be wondered that Saturday night Messrs Milton Bode and Edward Compton scored a veritable triumph.

It were utterly vain go through the pantomime scene by scene and narrate its plot. Everybody is familiar with the storey of “Aladdin,” and of this we get just a glimpse here and there. The hero, the son of a poor widow, is a very naughty boy, who goes off with a sham uncle to discover a treasure in a cave by means of a magic lamp, finds it and keeps it, frustrating the machinations of the false uncle, and, becoming rich, is betrothed to a fair princess, with whom he is in love. That is all. The poor little story crops up, as we have said, now and then, but as soon as it shows its tiny head it is drowned in music-hall melody, crushed by the feet of pretty dancing girls, or knocked all to pieces by irresponsible clowns. As a matter of fact, there was no time for the harlequinade proper on the first nigh. But what of that? The pantomime was practically one harlequinade from beginning end. And that is just what a pantomime ought to be. They may do it in a more refined manner at the West-end, but in North London something more spicy and racy is wanted. And Dalston gets it with a vengeance. Aladdin in the comedy persona of Miss Marie Elsie is a most charming “principle boy” whose acting is better than her singing, although this is marked by much point and expression; the youth’s beloved Princess Badroulbadour is impersonated by Miss Marion Ayling, who has a really good voice, and looks well in her lovely costumes; Abanazar, the “crafty magician,” played by Mr. Edwin Brett, is very funny, and so are Ski Hi, the Emperor of China, (Mr. A.J. W. Henson); So Long, his Grand Vizier.  (Mr. A. E. Godfrey); Wishee Washee, the bath man (Mr Ronaldo Martin), and the two grotesque policemen. Bo Bi and Bo Ko (Masers. Walton and Lester), while Electra, the genie the lamp (Miss Florence Landergan); Pekoe,another lady boy (Miss Nellie Harding); and the maids of honour. So Shi and Petti Sing (Misses Mavis Hope and Bessie Ray) are all very pretty and sweet. But the presiding and pervading spirit of the whole performance is the robust, uproarious, laughter-moving Widow Twankay of Mr. Ted Young, an actor of the Herbert Campbell school, who acts and sings with a vigour that could hardly be surpassed, who has a fine resonant voice that enables every word his many funny songs to be heard, and has talent for stage gags and business that almost amounts to genius. All do their work well, butt Mr. Ted Young certainly does mow then anyone else to “keep the thing going.”

Then there are some special people in the pantomime whose personality and performance have nothing what ever to do with the story of “Aladdin.” First among these we should name Mr. Edouard Espinosa, an agile fantastic dancer, many of whose pas are very novel and dexterous. Then there is the Great Little Levite and his troupe, who introduce their side-splitting scene with sham horses in tandem, which went with one roar; and  among the moat charming features the whole mow were Mr. John Tiller’s dancers – his Ruby Quartette and Jewel Ballet, all pretty girls with lovely forms, step, and attired in the most enchanting costumes. The Quartette were special favourites of the evening, and had three turns, each time different set artistic dresses.

The whole performance went extremely well, and, for a first pantomime new theatre, its success was remarkable. There was, to all appearance, not a single hitch. If anything went wrong “behind” it was unobserved front. There was, have said, time for the harlequinade, the transformation scene was also omitted; but no doubt, the public will have on Boxing Day all they have been promised, and future audiences will enjoy in its completeness, and with added finish, a thoroughly good, picturesque, tuneful, and, above all, funny pantomime.

The Daily Telegraph & Courier (London) – Monday 26th December 1898

 

August 17, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Aladdin, Bessie Ray, Gabrielle Ray, Pantomimes, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Bessie Ray – The Belle of New York – The Era – Saturday 2nd February 1901

AMUSEMENTS IN GREENOCK

(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT)

THEATRE ROYAL. – Lessee and Manager, Mr Alexander Wright, – The Belle of New York was performed here at this theatre on Monday by Mr Ben Greet’s No. 1 company. The part of Ichabod Bronson is well filled by Mr Arthur Ricketts. Harry Bronson has a capital representative in Mr Charles Gervase. As Carl Von Pumperknick Mr Peter H. Gardner gives a clever portrayal. Mr Tom Carling is extremely amusing as “Doc” Snifkins. Mr William Pringle makes an excellent Blinky Bill M’Quirk. Mr James R. La Fane is smart as Kenneth Mugg. Messrs Clayton and Gilford acquit themselves admirably as Counts Patsi Rattatoe. William D’Arey is good Twiddles. Mr T. Syme makes a quaint Snooper. Mr W. James is successful as Peeper. Mr L. Jones proves able exponent of Billy Breese. Miss Daisy Semon is very attractive Violet Gray, singing agreeably. Miss Nellie Bowman is lively Fifi Fricot. Miss B. Ease is vivacious Kissie Fitzgarter. Miss Elaine Gryee makes pleasing Cora Angelique. The subsidiary parts are in competent hands, and receive careful treatment from Messrs Alec Chantrens, C. Leonard, W. Smith; and Misses Bessie Ray, Sophie Clarkson, and G. Nelsam. A Chinese dance by Misses Marie Gilbert, Sophie Clarkson, Maud Eaton, and Jessie Vokes, is much appreciated. The play is exceedingly well staged, and the costumes are pretty and effective

 

The Era – Saturday 2nd February 1901

August 16, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Bessie Ray, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, The Belle of New York, The Era, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Linkman – The Irish Daily Independent And Nation – Monday 20th July 1903

AMUSEMENTS.

GAIETY THEATRE.

Mr. Geo. Edwardes’ entire company, scenery and effects brought from the Gaiety Theatre, London, will appear at the above theatre this week in the musical comedy entitled the “Toreador,” which will be followed by The Linkman,” or Gaiety memories. The company has never appeared in Dublin before. The cast includes:-Masers, Fred Wright, jun. Lionel Mackinder, Geo. Grossmith, jun.; Robert Nainby, Harry Grattan, A. Hatherton, G. Gregory and Edmund Payne; Misses Violet Lloyd, Connie Ediss, Hilda Jacobsen, Adrienne Augarde, Florence Allen, L. West, Daisy Holly, Florrie Warde, Gabrielle Ray, K. Mason.

The Irish Daily Independent And Nation – Monday 20th July 1903

Note: Although Miss Ray is shown in the cast of The Linkman there are no reviews to show that she actually appeared, also reviews show that she was performing in The Girl from Kay’s

 

August 13, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, The Linkman, Uncategorized | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gabrielle Ray (Philco 3239 E) – Odol Advertisement

Gabrielle Ray (Philco 3239 E)

August 12, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Advertisement, Autograph, Deltiology, Gabrielle Ray, Philco, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment