Gabrielle Ray

'Gabrielle Ray said, 'I am always dancing; I love it! When I don't dance, I sing. What else is there to do?'

Gabrielle Ray – Poinsetta – Middlesex County Times – Saturday 16th December 1911

NOTES FOR CHRISTMAS SHOPPERS

 

The Christmas shopper of either sex will find many suggestions for presents in the window, of 12 The Mall, Ealing, the premises of Mr. Ernest Drayton, chemist. Perfumery is the moat prominent feature of a very pleasing window-display, and this includes a wonderful new scent, Poinsetta, which, it will interest the ladies especially to know, has been selected, approved, and used by Miss Phyllis Dare Miss Olive May, Miss Gabrielle Ray, and Miss Connie Ediss.  The makers, Messrs. Atkinson, of 24, Old Bond-street, London, consider it the masterpiece of their many beautiful perfumes, of which Mr. Drayton has a large stock.

 

Middlesex County Times – Saturday 16th December 1911

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Gabrielle Ray – The Stage – Thursday 29th April 1920

MANCHESTER.

 

Palace (M.D., Alan Young; S. and A.M., Jesse Hewitt; A. A.M., W. Maclaren). The winning charm and dainty artistry of Gabrielle Ray are pleasingly featured here. She has a clever partner in Leslie Barker. Billy Merson requires no comment; he is just himself, and patrons enjoy the fun thoroughly. Vasco, the mad musician is popular, and St. Juste and Higgins provide harmony and humour. Among others are the Three Daring Reos and Graham and Cullen

 

The Stage – Thursday 29th April 1920

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The Casino Girl – Huddersfield Daily Examiner – Tuesday 21st October 1902

 

“THE CASINO GIRL”

AT THE THEATRE ROYAL.

 

Under the direction of Mr. J. Bannister Howard, Mr. Ben Greet’s company on tour performing “The Casino Girl” commenced a week’s engagement at the Theatre Royal last night. The piece is described as a musical farce in two acts, written by Harry B. Smith, music by Ludwig Englander. As a fact the piece is nearly as much a pantomime as a farce, it is built up on the flimsiest pretence of a story, and the music, though bright, tuneful, and spirited, and containing two or three expressive songs, and one or two choruses of some distinctive character, is mainly of the music hall song and dance tape, leaving no impression on the memory.

The piece contains plenty of opportunity for making fan, mostly of the frivolous order, and the company take the utmost advantage of this, as that, with songs, choruses, and dances, and plenty of “go,” attention is secured, the ear tickled, and the risible faculty kept on the alert from beginning to end of the performance. But beyond this there is mach to gratify the sight. With the scenes of the two acts representing respectively “A Street in Cairo” and “The Pasha’s Palace,” splendidly painted and set, with a very large company of ladies personating American tourists, members of a stranded English opera company, wives of the pash, dancing girls, odalisques, slaves etc in charming costumes of many types and a variety of colours more brilliant and beautiful than we have men in Huddersfield for a very long time, and with men in the uniform of Turkish soldiers, spectacle follows spectacle with almost dazzling effect in their kaleidoscopic picturesqueness. Thus an entertainment is provided which, although light and frivolous, is very mirthful, bright, and satisfying while it lasts. Laura Lee, formerly of the New York Casino Company, known as Mille. Estelle, a French milliner, whom we suppose is the Casino Girl, has a delightful exponent in Miss Maud Darling, who has a soprano voice of beautiful quality, sings artistically, dances with sprightliness, and plays her part with remarkable piquancy and finish. Pilsener  Pasha, who obtained his title by introducing beer into Egypt, has in Mr, J. E. Sullivan an extremely comical representative, who excites frequent peals of laughter by the volubility of his broken German-English and carious modes of expression, and by his very funny acting, singing, and dancing. Mr. Eardley Turner shows himself to he a clever actor as J. Offenbach Gaggs known as Signor Hasbeeni, an operatic tenor, whose company has got into financial difficulties in Cairo. His burlesque is exceedingly good, not being too extravagant, and having the merits of truth and finish about it, especially in his clever caricature of Sousa conducting his hand, in which he poses with one leg bent and plays tricky variations with the baton very true to the style of the celebrated conductor. Mr. Turner was good in the delivery of his lines, and his recital rather than singing of the doleful song, “Nothing New,” to band accompaniment, was most amusing. Percy Harold Ethelbert Van Stuyvesant, a New York doctor in love with the Casino Girl, who gets arrested in mistake for Ben Muley, chief of a gang of thieves, but is ultimately released by the help of the Casino Girl, to whom he becomes united, is remounted admirably by Mr. Laurence Wensley, who plays his part with naturalness and finish, dances gracefully, and sings with excellent voice and taste, especially the song, “”I love my love in the springtime.” Miss Connie Leon is very smart as Miss Roxana Rocks, an heiress from Chicago, and she sings with good voice and artistic method. Miss Gabrielle Ray is a charming figure as Dolly Twinkle, leading dancer of the opera company, and she is sufficiently pert, dances admirably, and sings nicely considering the smallness of her voice. Miss Madge Cleaver makes the best of her part of Mrs. H. Malaprop Rocks, the better half of a Chicago pork packer, though many of the wrong words put into the mouth of this Yankee version of our own Mrs. Malaprop are by no means mistakes which an uneducated woman would naturally fall into. Ben Maley, the real chief of the gang of thieves, and Postage, his lieutenant, are most cleverly represented by Mr. Stanley White and Mr. Walter Freear, two panto mimic knockabouts of the very best “long and short of it” type, whose antics, especially those of Mr. Freear, the cheeky little bandit, are extremely comical and provocative of laughter. Misses Annie Johnson, Bessie Middleton, and Rosie Clare are exceedingly sprightly, elastic, and graceful principal dancers. The chorus singing is remarkable for the fullness and freshness of the voices and for unity, tunefulness, and taste; and the band parts, which have no particularly distinguishing features, are well played. The nearest approach to mode of operatic character is reached in the Egyptian choruses, in which there is some local colour, and in the finale to the first act, a very well-written number, which was worked up effectively, alike from musical, dramatic, and spectacular points of view.

 

Huddersfield Daily Examiner – Tuesday 21st October 1902

 

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Lady Madcap – 300th performance – The People – Sunday 13th September 1903

The second edition of “Lady Madcap” at the Prince of Wales’s Theatre was further augmented, on the occasion of the 300th performance, by the introduction of a new song for Mr. Gordon Cleather “The Ladies,” and the famous “La Maxixe,” which is danced with great success by Miss Gabrielle Ray and Miss Craske. Mr. George Edwardes is constantly introducing novelties to keep the piece up to date.

 

The People – Sunday 13th September 1903

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A Girl on the Stage – Morning Post – Monday 7th May 1906

 

 

PRINCE OF WALES’ THEATRE.

 

“A GIRL ON THE STAGE.”

A Musical Play in Three Acts, founded on “The Little Cherub.”

 

Mr. George has accustomed the play going public to second editions of his musical comedies which have little left of the originals save the framework, but they have been invariably brought out at the end of long runs when the and dances and incidents which once pleased had become stale through repetition. It is a new departure for him to adopt such methods to a piece which is still at the beginning its career if  judged the usual runs of Mr. Edwardes’s musical pieces, but this is what he has done with “The Little Cherub,” for “A Girl on the Stage” cannot any stretch of imagination be called a new production. The plot, no doubt, has been altered somewhat, and the alteration is a decided improvement. Molly Montrose, the actress, is now really in love with Lord Congress, the Earl of Sanctobury’s son, a new character, who returns her love, and her rather pronounced flirtation with the old Earl has the laudable purpose in view of getting his consent to their marriage. The whole play is made pleasanter in consequence, and even the supper scene in the second act, if still a trifle wearisome and stagey, does not jar as it did in, places the first night. But the plot, everyone knows, is not of prime importance in musical comedies, and most of the scenes and the chief  incidents followed one another on Saturday night very much in the order of their original setting, although a careful discrimination has been used, and where alterations or additions have been made they have been almost invariably improvements.

A dozen new numbers have been added to the score, six of which are from the pen Mr. Ivan Caryll. Three of these occur in the first act, and all were received with favour. The most successful was perhaps one entitled “Rather Nice,” which was sung with great charm by Miss Ruth Vincent, who now plays the part of Molly Montrose. It was followed by a very pleasing dance executed by her with a delicacy and grace which made beautiful the simplest movements. A new duet “Love in a Cottage,” in which she shared honours with another newcomer, Mr. Lionel Mackinder, who plays the part of the newly-discovered son of Lord Sanctobury, was also enthusiastically received. Miss Vincent has not been seen London since she achieved such remarkable success “Veronique” and her reception was of the warmest and most friendly description. A delicacy and refinement of acting made her overtures to the old Earl appear quite charming, and much of the success of the performance Saturday evening must be placed to her credit. Mr. Willie Edonin has not quite warmed to his work as the new Earl of Sanctobury, but all parts grow in his hands, and it may safely be prophesied that he will be the life of the piece far as its comedy concerned before long. He is always particularly good in the little scenes byplay, backwaters the main stream, which he seems to create for himself, and some of these were received on Saturday with the heartiest favour. Many of the old favourites remain, among them Mr. G. Carroll, who was as droll as ever. His dance with Miss Doris Dene was one of the successes of the evening. Miss Zena Dare and that delightful dancer Miss Gabrielle Ray, who has deserted the Gaiety for the Prince of Wales’, made the most of their parts, and Mr. W. H. Berry was excellent as Lord Sanctobury’s valet.

Mr. Edwardes stands alone as regards stage decoration, but has surely beaten his own record the exquisite “Cupid and Pierrot” scone in the third act. He has made a daring experiment building his new piece on “The Little Cherub,” but if may judge its reception on Saturday night will be successful one.

Morning Post – Monday 7th May 1906

 

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Gabrielle Ray – The Little Cherub – The Tatler – Wednesday 7th February 1906

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Gabrielle Ray – Manchester Evening News – Tuesday 27th April 1920

 

The Halls

 

A better programme than the one arranged at the Palace could not be desired. There dainty Miss Gabrielle Ray and her partner Leslie Barker in a very artistic “turn,” Billy Merson is popular and seemingly funnier than ever, St. Juste and Higgins with jest and song, and Graham and Cullen, the Army and Navy “knuts” in cleaver cross talk.

 

Manchester Evening News – Tuesday 27th April 1920

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Gabrielle Ray – Daily Telegraph – May 1973

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Notable Visitors – Perthshire Advertiser – Saturday 10th July 1920

Notable Visitors.

Among the visitors to Auchterarder and to Gleneagles Golf Course this week were Sir Andrew Fisher, High Commissioner of Australia, and Gabriel Ray, the famous actress.

Mary Pickford also visited the town in the earlier part of the week, when many flocked to see her at “The Picture House” !

 

Perthshire Advertiser – Saturday 10th July 1920

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Gabrielle Ray (Rotary 733 J)

 

Gabrielle Ray (J. Beagles 733 J)

January 18, 2019 Posted by | Actress, Deltiology, Gabrielle Ray, Rotary, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , | Leave a comment