Gabrielle Ray

'Gabrielle Ray said, 'I am always dancing; I love it! When I don't dance, I sing. What else is there to do?'

Amy Webster

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March 11, 2019 Posted by | Actress, Amy Webster, Autograph, Deltiology, Eric Loder, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Girl on the Stage – Morning Post – Monday 7th May 1906

 

 

PRINCE OF WALES’ THEATRE.

 

“A GIRL ON THE STAGE.”

A Musical Play in Three Acts, founded on “The Little Cherub.”

 

Mr. George has accustomed the play going public to second editions of his musical comedies which have little left of the originals save the framework, but they have been invariably brought out at the end of long runs when the and dances and incidents which once pleased had become stale through repetition. It is a new departure for him to adopt such methods to a piece which is still at the beginning its career if  judged the usual runs of Mr. Edwardes’s musical pieces, but this is what he has done with “The Little Cherub,” for “A Girl on the Stage” cannot any stretch of imagination be called a new production. The plot, no doubt, has been altered somewhat, and the alteration is a decided improvement. Molly Montrose, the actress, is now really in love with Lord Congress, the Earl of Sanctobury’s son, a new character, who returns her love, and her rather pronounced flirtation with the old Earl has the laudable purpose in view of getting his consent to their marriage. The whole play is made pleasanter in consequence, and even the supper scene in the second act, if still a trifle wearisome and stagey, does not jar as it did in, places the first night. But the plot, everyone knows, is not of prime importance in musical comedies, and most of the scenes and the chief  incidents followed one another on Saturday night very much in the order of their original setting, although a careful discrimination has been used, and where alterations or additions have been made they have been almost invariably improvements.

A dozen new numbers have been added to the score, six of which are from the pen Mr. Ivan Caryll. Three of these occur in the first act, and all were received with favour. The most successful was perhaps one entitled “Rather Nice,” which was sung with great charm by Miss Ruth Vincent, who now plays the part of Molly Montrose. It was followed by a very pleasing dance executed by her with a delicacy and grace which made beautiful the simplest movements. A new duet “Love in a Cottage,” in which she shared honours with another newcomer, Mr. Lionel Mackinder, who plays the part of the newly-discovered son of Lord Sanctobury, was also enthusiastically received. Miss Vincent has not been seen London since she achieved such remarkable success “Veronique” and her reception was of the warmest and most friendly description. A delicacy and refinement of acting made her overtures to the old Earl appear quite charming, and much of the success of the performance Saturday evening must be placed to her credit. Mr. Willie Edonin has not quite warmed to his work as the new Earl of Sanctobury, but all parts grow in his hands, and it may safely be prophesied that he will be the life of the piece far as its comedy concerned before long. He is always particularly good in the little scenes byplay, backwaters the main stream, which he seems to create for himself, and some of these were received on Saturday with the heartiest favour. Many of the old favourites remain, among them Mr. G. Carroll, who was as droll as ever. His dance with Miss Doris Dene was one of the successes of the evening. Miss Zena Dare and that delightful dancer Miss Gabrielle Ray, who has deserted the Gaiety for the Prince of Wales’, made the most of their parts, and Mr. W. H. Berry was excellent as Lord Sanctobury’s valet.

Mr. Edwardes stands alone as regards stage decoration, but has surely beaten his own record the exquisite “Cupid and Pierrot” scone in the third act. He has made a daring experiment building his new piece on “The Little Cherub,” but if may judge its reception on Saturday night will be successful one.

Morning Post – Monday 7th May 1906

 

January 27, 2019 Posted by | A Girl on the Stage, Actress, Amy Webster, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Amy Webster (Tuck 4486)

May 19, 2018 Posted by | Actress, Amy Webster, Deltiology, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, Tuck, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Amy Webster – 1907

Amy Webster – The Merry Widow – The Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News – Saturday 15th June 1907

February 6, 2018 Posted by | Actress, Amy Webster, Daly's Theatre, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, The Merry Widow, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Amy Webster – The Sketch – 8th May 1907

November 29, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Amy Webster, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, The Sketch, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Amy Webster – Lady Madcap – The Penny Illustrated Paper – Saturday 5th August 1905

November 12, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Amy Webster, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Amy Webster – The Sketch – Wednesday 15th July 1903

Amy Webster – The Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News – Saturday 27th June 1903

November 8, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Amy Webster, Social History, The Sketch, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Amy Webster – Daily Telegraph & Courier (London) – Saturday 27th March 1909

Before the PRESIDENT.

TWO CO-RESPONDENTS.

 

Lieutenant Owain Edward Greaves, an officer the 3rd Hussars, asked for a divorce from his wife Mrs. Amy Greaves, on account her misconduct with Mr. Eric Loder and Mr. George Jervis Wood. The case stood in the official list one which was be heard his lordship with a special jury, but when came for trial it was undefended.

Mr. Rufus Isaacs, K.C., Mr. Barnard. K.C. and Mr. J. Harvey Murphy (instructed by Messers, Lewis and Lewis) appeared for Lieutenant Greaves, Mr. F. E. Smith, K.C., Mr. Walter Frampton, Mr. Barrington Ward (instructed by Messers, Arthur Newton and Co.) represented Mrs. Greaves, while Sir Edward Carson, K. C., and Mr. Willock (instructed by Messers. Mackrell and Ward) were for Mr. Wood. Mr. Eric Loder, the other respondent was not represented by counsel.

In opening the case, Mr. Rufus Iassacs said that the petition was presented Mr. Owain Edward Greaves, a lieutenant in the 3rd Hussars, against his wife, who was a Miss Amy Webster, who was on the Stage. They were married in March, 1906, and some nine or ten months afterwards Lieutenant Greaves went with his regiment to India. Subsequently it was found that the lady had been staying at hotels at Worthing and Brighton, first with Mr. Eric and then with Mr. Wood.

Lieutenant Greaves, replying to Mr. Isaacs, said he first became acquainted with Miss Amy Webster about August, 1905. She was then on the stage. On March 15, 1906, they were married the Fulham Registry Office. For some time Mrs. Greaves occupied a flat at Twyford mansions, which was provided by witness. The marriage was kept secret, because witness was in difficulty about announcing it, having regard to the position he occupied in his regiment. Subsequently he exchanged into the 3rd Hussars, and went to India, provision being made for his wife while he was absent. During the time he was away they corresponded regularly, and in affectionate terms.

Mr. George H. Warne, proprietor of Warne’s Hotel, Worthing, said that in September, 1907, a lady and gentleman stayed there under name of Mr. and Mrs. Forsyth. They occupied communicating rooms. Emily Francis, who was chambermaid at Warne’s Hotel, said she had identified the lady who stayed the hotel under name of Mrs. Forsyth as the respondent in that suit.

Gilbert E. Smith, a chauffeur, stated that had seen Mr. Eric Loder at Worthing, and had driven that gentlemen and a lady on several occasions. Witness identified the lady as Mrs. Greaves, who was sitting next to her solicitor.

Mary Robertson, chambermaid the Hotel Metropole, Brighton, was then called. She remembered Mr. Wood staying at the hotel with a lady. They occupied communicating rooms.

At this stage Sir Edward Carson said did not propose to ask any questions on behalf of his client, Mr. Wood.

Mr. Smith also said did not propose to ask any questions.

Mr. Percy Hill, assistant manager of the Hotel Metropole, Brighton, said knew Mr. Wood and also the respondent. They had been guests at the hotel on several occasions.

The President: Very well, there must be a decree.

Sir Edward Canon asked that there should be no order as to costs against the co-respondents; there was no allegation that it was known that respondent was married woman.

The President made no order as to costs.

Mr. Isaacs: I think your lordship ought to know that some provision had been made for the wife, and also with reference the furniture of the flat she occupies.

 

The Daily Telegraph & Courier (London) – Saturday 27th March 1909

 

Mr George H. Warne, the proprietor of Warne’s Hotel, Worthing, said that in September, 1907, a man and woman stayed at his hotel as Mr and Mrs Forsyth. They occupied rooms 26 and 27, which consisted of a  double-bedded room and dressing-room communicating.

Emily France, a chambermaid at Warne’s Hotel, stated that she found a breakfast tray for two in room 26. .She subsequently identified the lady who accompanied Mr Loder as the respondent, Mrs Greaves.

 

The Shields Daily News – Saturday 27th March 1909

 

Eric Loder – Yorkshire Evening Post – 1909

September 30, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Amy Webster, Eric Loder, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Amy Webster – The Merry Widow – The Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News – Saturday 15th June 1907

May 15, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Amy Webster, Daly's Theatre, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, The Illustrated Sporting & Dramatic News, The Merry Widow, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Amy Webster – The Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News – Saturday 1st September 1906

May 15, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Amy Webster, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, The Illustrated Sporting & Dramatic News, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment