Gabrielle Ray

'Gabrielle Ray said, 'I am always dancing; I love it! When I don't dance, I sing. What else is there to do?'

Gladys Ray – Aladdin – The Era – Saturday 22nd December 1906

Gladys Ray – Aladdin – The Sporting Life – Tuesday 25th December 1906

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October 24, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Aladdin, Gabrielle Ray, Gladys Ray, Gladys Raymond, Pantomimes, Social History, The Era, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gladys Ray – Aladdin – The Sporting Life – Tuesday 25th December 1906

 

THE THEATRES.

CRYSTAL PALACE PANTOMIME & CIRCUS

 

One could hardly realise that he was witnessing the first performance of the pantomime at the Crystal Palace yesterday, so well did those engaged fall into their various parts. This year “Aladdin” has been chosen by Mr J. Bannister Howard as the subject, and with the assistance of Mr Fred Bowyer to furnish the book and lyrics, a very entertaining piece is the result. The story runs upon the old, old lines which have been so familiar for years.

From the first scene – there are a dozen in all – to the last, all are exceedingly pretty. Many clever changes take place, all being smartly managed. Of course, the cave is about the best, though the Throne Room in the Emperor’s Palace runs it close for effect. Quite up-to-date too are some of the ideas introduced, for in one scene the career of a motor car is shown by means of the cinematograph.

To Miss Lillie Lassah is entrusted the port of Aladdin and as she is possessed of a fine voice and the ability to dance, one could hardly wish for a better interpreter of the part. As the Princess, another clever principal is found in Miss Lily Gullick, who also sings and dances well. The comedians evidently intend that the piece shall not lack in fun. As Abanazar, Mr Arthur Poole has a fine part, in which he brings out all the points possible, his by-play and gag being especially good. Mr A. E. Passmore, in the character of Widow Twankey, revels in his part, and two splendid artists of the knock-about order are the Brothers Onda. Their performance on the horizontal bar stamps them gymnasts of no mean order. Other parts are in the hands of Miss Nellie Barnwell (Pekoe), Miss Gladys Ray (Petti-Sing), Mr Prank Weir (Wishee-Washee), Mr E. Oxlee (Emperor), while several excellent glees are rendered by the XL Quartette.

Sporting Life – Tuesday 25th December 1906

 

September 12, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Aladdin, Gabrielle Ray, Gladys Ray, Gladys Raymond, Pantomimes, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Gladys Raymond – Aladdin – South London Chronicle – Friday 19 October 1906

CRYSTAL PALACE

PANTOMIME

It is welcome news to learn that Mr. Bannister Howard intends to revive old-fashioned pantomime at the Crystal Palace Theatre. That style of entertainment which has been called pantomime during the past few years has become rather boring, and has not been particularly amusing, either to grown-up people or children. Any effort, therefore, to return to the rollicking performances of bygone days deserves to be supported, and no doubt Mr. Howard’s enterprise will be crowned with success. The subject of the pantomime is the old favourite story of “Aladdin,” and in the hands of so experienced a pantomime writer as Mr. Fred Bowyer, great things may be expected. No expense is to be spared, and an excellent company has been secured. Miss Lillie Lassah will impersonate Aladdin; Miss Lillie Gallick; the Princess; Mr. Arthur Pool, Abanazar; Mr. A. E. Passmore, Widow Twankey; the Ongar Brothers, the Policemen and Speciality turn; Miss Nellie Barnwell; Second Boy; Miss Gladys Ray (a sister of Miss Gabrielle Ray, who was originally brought out by Mr. Howard), Second Girl; Miss Josephine Sullivan, a Fairy; and Mr. J. D. Cawdery, Demon and Clown, who will also work the traps. He was at one time with Conquest, and is one of the oldest trapworkers left. The Harlequinade and Shadow Pantomime will be a strong feature of the entertainment. The Pantomime will be produced by Mr. C. Lake, and Mr. Joseph Sainton will compose and arrange the music. Mr. W. E. Sharpe will still continue to actively manage the front of the theatre.

South London Chronicle – Friday 19th October 1906

Note; The review of Aladdin shows Miss Ray’s sister Gladys Raymond referred to as Gladys Ray rather than Gladys Raymond, I’m not sure whether this is a misprint or whether she performed under this name as well

August 24, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Aladdin, Gabrielle Ray, Gladys Ray, Gladys Raymond, Pantomimes, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Bessie Ray – Aladdin – The Daily Telegraph & Courier (London) – Monday 26th December 1898

DALSTON.

“ALADDIN.”

 

In point of age the new and exceedingly comfortable theatre at Dalston is a very baby among metropolitan playhouses, for it is only some six months old. Hitherto it has been, so to speak, in leading strings, for its plays have been derived mainly from the successes of the leading London theatres. But now it has begun to run alone, and the new and original pantomime “Aladdin; or, the Naughty Young Scamp who ran off with the Lamp,” it made on Christmas Eve its first step. And firm and promising first step it was. The piece is written by Mr. Stanley Rogers, but as acted the author would probably fail recognise his own handiwork. It is worth while to get the printed play in order to secure a sort of supplementary entertainment, for there is little in the book that is heard on the stage and little that is done on the stage which is to be found in the book. Yet the performance is none the worse for that. It is a go-as-you-please affair, in which every actor seems to do what he likes, and, it must be admitted, does it well. There is very little Aladdin pure and simple in the pantomime. If analysed in chemical fashion the piece would be found to be compounded of many parts of variety show, comic business, and music-hall song and dance, with just a “trace” of the Hero of the Lamp. But it is capital entertainment nevertheless. Its predominating element is fun – good, hearty, boisterous, knock-about fun, that provokes shouts, peals, screams, and yells of laughter from first to last. There is hardly a moment when the audience is not exploding and roaring with merriment, excited by some delicious piece of nonsense and absurdity. Another strong element of the pantomime is its music. Of this there is plenty—any quantity of rollicking comic songs and melodious ballads -while the orchestra, under the baton Mr. E. T. de Bansie, does its work most excellently. Yet another feature of the play is its exquisite and dainty dancing, and when to all this are added well-painted and scenery and superb and tasteful dresses and general good all-round performance by the clever actors and actresses engaged, it will not be wondered that Saturday night Messrs Milton Bode and Edward Compton scored a veritable triumph.

It were utterly vain go through the pantomime scene by scene and narrate its plot. Everybody is familiar with the storey of “Aladdin,” and of this we get just a glimpse here and there. The hero, the son of a poor widow, is a very naughty boy, who goes off with a sham uncle to discover a treasure in a cave by means of a magic lamp, finds it and keeps it, frustrating the machinations of the false uncle, and, becoming rich, is betrothed to a fair princess, with whom he is in love. That is all. The poor little story crops up, as we have said, now and then, but as soon as it shows its tiny head it is drowned in music-hall melody, crushed by the feet of pretty dancing girls, or knocked all to pieces by irresponsible clowns. As a matter of fact, there was no time for the harlequinade proper on the first nigh. But what of that? The pantomime was practically one harlequinade from beginning end. And that is just what a pantomime ought to be. They may do it in a more refined manner at the West-end, but in North London something more spicy and racy is wanted. And Dalston gets it with a vengeance. Aladdin in the comedy persona of Miss Marie Elsie is a most charming “principle boy” whose acting is better than her singing, although this is marked by much point and expression; the youth’s beloved Princess Badroulbadour is impersonated by Miss Marion Ayling, who has a really good voice, and looks well in her lovely costumes; Abanazar, the “crafty magician,” played by Mr. Edwin Brett, is very funny, and so are Ski Hi, the Emperor of China, (Mr. A.J. W. Henson); So Long, his Grand Vizier.  (Mr. A. E. Godfrey); Wishee Washee, the bath man (Mr Ronaldo Martin), and the two grotesque policemen. Bo Bi and Bo Ko (Masers. Walton and Lester), while Electra, the genie the lamp (Miss Florence Landergan); Pekoe,another lady boy (Miss Nellie Harding); and the maids of honour. So Shi and Petti Sing (Misses Mavis Hope and Bessie Ray) are all very pretty and sweet. But the presiding and pervading spirit of the whole performance is the robust, uproarious, laughter-moving Widow Twankay of Mr. Ted Young, an actor of the Herbert Campbell school, who acts and sings with a vigour that could hardly be surpassed, who has a fine resonant voice that enables every word his many funny songs to be heard, and has talent for stage gags and business that almost amounts to genius. All do their work well, butt Mr. Ted Young certainly does mow then anyone else to “keep the thing going.”

Then there are some special people in the pantomime whose personality and performance have nothing what ever to do with the story of “Aladdin.” First among these we should name Mr. Edouard Espinosa, an agile fantastic dancer, many of whose pas are very novel and dexterous. Then there is the Great Little Levite and his troupe, who introduce their side-splitting scene with sham horses in tandem, which went with one roar; and  among the moat charming features the whole mow were Mr. John Tiller’s dancers – his Ruby Quartette and Jewel Ballet, all pretty girls with lovely forms, step, and attired in the most enchanting costumes. The Quartette were special favourites of the evening, and had three turns, each time different set artistic dresses.

The whole performance went extremely well, and, for a first pantomime new theatre, its success was remarkable. There was, to all appearance, not a single hitch. If anything went wrong “behind” it was unobserved front. There was, have said, time for the harlequinade, the transformation scene was also omitted; but no doubt, the public will have on Boxing Day all they have been promised, and future audiences will enjoy in its completeness, and with added finish, a thoroughly good, picturesque, tuneful, and, above all, funny pantomime.

The Daily Telegraph & Courier (London) – Monday 26th December 1898

 

August 17, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Aladdin, Bessie Ray, Gabrielle Ray, Pantomimes, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Bessie Ray – Aladdin – Leamington Spa Courier – 1897

Bessie Ray - Aladdin - Leamington  Spa Courier - Saturday 27 February 1897

 

 

Patrons of the Leamington Theatre Royal have this week been afforded a change of fare in the shape of a pantomime produced by Messrs. H. Dundas’s and J. W. Nightingale’s company under the personal supervision of the former. The pantomime is founded upon the fairy story of “Aladdin and the Magic Lamp,” and was produced in several towns with considerable success before being brought to Leamington. It cannot be said to be one of those fine spectacular shows which are now so popular with the public, partaking, as it does, more of the nature of a burlesque performance in which knockabout business is freely introduced. The book by Mr. Harry F. McClelland, the author of several well known pantomimes, and the greater portion of it is brightly written, but some of the business introduced by the knockabouts is neither new nor very original. At the same time there is much at which one can laugh. There are also one or two pretty songs introduced in the various scenes and some graceful dancing, but the music for the most part is not in any sense as catchy as that associated with some former productions of a similar kind. The pantomime comprises the usual chrematistics in the shape of bright costumes, dances with electrical effects, and interchange of scene and the fairly good house which assembled on Monday night to witness the first performance, appeared to be very well satisfied with all they saw and heard. Some of the songs were encored and at times during the evening applause was liberally bestowed. One of the most pleasing features of the production is a very graceful exhibition of the terpsichorean are by the little Bessie Ray, who is likewise a cleaver vocalist. Of the artistes included in the company some are exceedingly capable. Miss Florence Lynn makes a graceful Aladdin and is also a vocalist of some ability. Miss Lottie Linda sustains the role of the Princess with ease and grace, whilst Miss Winifred Davies makes a smart looking fairy. Mr Fred Dark gives an amusing and diverting performance in the character of Widow Twankey and his burlesque of a prima-donna is exceedingly amusing. Mr. Leonard May as Abanazar, Mr.R. Lewis as the Emperor, and Mr. C. D. Cooper as the Vazier are all good in their respective parts. Bishop and Vale contributed a good deal to the amusement of the evening as knockabout artists, whilst the Zellia quartette and the Sisters Ivey proved clever and graceful dancers. The subject of the transformation scene is “The Haunt of Mermaids in the Realms of Bliss.” It is painted by Mr. W. T. Hemsley and is a very credible achievement of stage art. The last performance of the pantomime will be given this (Saturday) evening, and there will also be a matinee performance this afternoon at two o’clock.

June 7, 2013 Posted by | Actress, Aladdin, Gabrielle Ray, Pantomimes, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Bessie Ray – Aladdin – The Era – 1897

Bessie Ray - Aladdin - The Era - 20th February 1897

June 7, 2013 Posted by | Actress, Aladdin, Bessie Ray, Gabrielle Ray, Pantomimes, Social History, The Era, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Bessie Ray – Aladdin – The Era – 1898

June 7, 2013 Posted by | Actress, Aladdin, Bessie Ray, Gabrielle Ray, Pantomimes, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment