Gabrielle Ray

'Gabrielle Ray said, 'I am always dancing; I love it! When I don't dance, I sing. What else is there to do?'

The Merry Widow – The Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News – 6th March 1909

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September 23, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Daly's Theatre, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, The Illustrated Sporting & Dramatic News, The Merry Widow, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gladys Ray – Aladdin – The Sporting Life – Tuesday 25th December 1906

 

THE THEATRES.

CRYSTAL PALACE PANTOMIME & CIRCUS

 

One could hardly realise that he was witnessing the first performance of the pantomime at the Crystal Palace yesterday, so well did those engaged fall into their various parts. This year “Aladdin” has been chosen by Mr J. Bannister Howard as the subject, and with the assistance of Mr Fred Bowyer to furnish the book and lyrics, a very entertaining piece is the result. The story runs upon the old, old lines which have been so familiar for years.

From the first scene – there are a dozen in all – to the last, all are exceedingly pretty. Many clever changes take place, all being smartly managed. Of course, the cave is about the best, though the Throne Room in the Emperor’s Palace runs it close for effect. Quite up-to-date too are some of the ideas introduced, for in one scene the career of a motor car is shown by means of the cinematograph.

To Miss Lillie Lassah is entrusted the port of Aladdin and as she is possessed of a fine voice and the ability to dance, one could hardly wish for a better interpreter of the part. As the Princess, another clever principal is found in Miss Lily Gullick, who also sings and dances well. The comedians evidently intend that the piece shall not lack in fun. As Abanazar, Mr Arthur Poole has a fine part, in which he brings out all the points possible, his by-play and gag being especially good. Mr A. E. Passmore, in the character of Widow Twankey, revels in his part, and two splendid artists of the knock-about order are the Brothers Onda. Their performance on the horizontal bar stamps them gymnasts of no mean order. Other parts are in the hands of Miss Nellie Barnwell (Pekoe), Miss Gladys Ray (Petti-Sing), Mr Prank Weir (Wishee-Washee), Mr E. Oxlee (Emperor), while several excellent glees are rendered by the XL Quartette.

Sporting Life – Tuesday 25th December 1906

 

September 12, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Aladdin, Gabrielle Ray, Gladys Ray, Gladys Raymond, Pantomimes, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gabrielle Ray (J. Beagles G 665 A)

September 9, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Deltiology, Gabrielle Ray, J. Beagles, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gabrielle Ray (Cigarette card No 16)

The Little Cherub (Rotary 2008 Y)

September 9, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Cigarette card, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, The Little Cherub, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Gaiety Theatre – The Illustrated London News – 2nd January 1869

The Gaiety Theatre, Strand.

The successful opening of the new Gaiety Theatre, on Monday week, has been reported in our dramatic chronicle. This theatre, as our London readers know, has been built under the superintendence of Mr. C. J. Phipps, architect, on the site of the Strand Music-Hall and of some adjoining properties, which give it a frontage on the Strand, Exeter-street, Catherine-street, and Wellington-street. The Strand front of the music-hall remains almost as formerly. A few modifications, however, have necessarily been made on the ground story by the formation of the approach to the stalls and boxes of the theatre. The rooms over this entrance and the new building along the Strand and Catherine-street will form a restaurant, entirely distinct from the theatre, but with a corridor of access from every tier of the theatre. The entrance in the Strand leads by a few steps to the level of the stalls, and by a spacious staircase to the balcony or grand tier and the upper boxes. Another entrance, also on this level, is in Exeter-street, on the other side of the stalls, which, though designed specially as a private entrance for the Royal family, is available as an exit-way case of sudden panic, there being a stone staircase from the entrance to the highest floor of the theatre, with communication on every level. There is also a corridor running under the back of the pit, solely for the use of the stalls’ occupants, so as to get from side to side without crossing the audience. The entrances to pit and gallery are in Catherine-street, and the stage entrance is in Wellington-street. The auditorium includes a balcony, the front forming a semicircle of 24ft., opening out by arms of a contrary flexure a width of 43ft. to the proscenium column. Behind this is a tier of private boxes, as at the Adelphi, upper boxes, and a gallery above. The columns supporting the various tiers are carried up to a sufficient height above the gallery, and from the cap spring a series of pointed arches, supporting cornice and coved ceiling. The proscenium pillars are all of stone. The dimensions of the interior are – 54 ft. height from centre of pit to ceiling; 45 ft. depth from curtain to front of upper circle, and 36 ft. from curtain to front of balcony tier; 30 ft. width of proscenium; 41 ft. depth of stage, and 64 ft. width of stage between walls. There is room to seat 2000 persons. The floors of the boxes and corridors are of concrete upon iron joists. The stage has been constructed Mr. G. R. Tasker, clerk of the works. There is depth of some 20 ft. under it for sinking large scenes, and a height above of 50 ft. All the departments of the stage are very complete. There is a convenient green-room, and the dressing-rooms appear to be sufficiently numerous. The coloured decorations have been executed by Mr. George Gordon, who has also painted the act-drop, which a framed view of a palace on the Grand Canal, Venice. A noticeable feature of the decoration is the frieze over the proscenium, painted by Mr. H. S. Marks, 30 ft. long by ft. 6 in. deep. It represents a King and Queen of mediaeval times, with surrounding courtiers, watching mask which is being performed before them. On each side of this frieze, over the proscenium boxes, are lunettes in the arches – the one on the left represents lyric and the other epic poetry -designed by the same artist.

The Illustrated London News – Saturday 2nd January 1869

 

The Theatre of Enchantment

September 9, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, The Gaiety Theatre, The Illustrated London News, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gabrielle Ray – the Lord Mayor’s Cripples’ Fund – Herts. & Cambs Reporter and Royston Crow – Friday 8th March 1907

The Lord Mayor’s Cripples’ Fund

There was plenty of fun at Drury Lane on the occasion of the matinee for the benefit of the Lord Mayor’s Cripples’ Fund. The histrionic talent of London combined to produce a fine entertainment – one of that rare kind in which even the smallest part is taken by a master of the art. The principal plum in the pudding was Mr. E. T. Reed’s representation of “A Prehistoric Lord Mayor’s Show.” The distinguished Punch artist’s pictures looked all the more comic for being acted, many well-known scenes being represented. Here we saw the real old red sandstone Highlanders, the fire brigade of the Stone Age, and so on. Preceded by prehistoric Aldermen came the Lord Mayor of the year 10,000 B.C. – and Mr. C. H . Workman tried to look gracious while his coachman, Mr. W. H. Berry, made desperate attempts to be dignified – in skins. Before all galloped the startling figure of Mr. George Growssmith, junr., on a wonderful palaeolithic charger, which had, no doubt, been specially dug up for the occasion. Miss Jean Aylwin cut a fine figure as the Lady Mayoress, and could not but be flattered at having such a charming prototype in the journalist who reported the prehistoric show, represented by Miss Adrienne Augarde. Among other stars in the cast were Miss Louie Pounds and Miss Billie Burke. Other tit-bits in the programme were Mr. Beerbohm Tree and company in “The Man Who Was,” the second act of “The Beauty and the Barge,” by Mr. Cyril Maude, and a dance by Mdlle. Genee, Miss Gabrielle Ray, and Mr. W. Warde. Among the stars which shone brightly were also Mr. Lewis Waller, Mr. H. B. Irving, and Mr. Ben Davis. With such a galaxy of talent no wonder the house was full.

Herts. & Cambs Reporter and Royston Crow – Friday 8th March 1907

 

September 8, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Biography, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gabrielle Ray – The Merry Widow – The Daily Telegraph – Monday 9th September 1907

DALY’S THEATRE.

 “The Merry Widow” has more than fulfilled the promise of her first appearance; dainty, winsome and graceful, she has captured the hearts of the play-going public. Crowded houses at Daly’s attest her popularity, which seems only to increase with every performance. But Mr. George Edwardes has a particularly large-handed way with his patrons; even when the measure appears to be full, he is intent upon adding to its contents. In this spirit, although visitors to Daly’s are already abundantly satisfied with the fare offered them, Mr. Edwardes introduced on Saturday night a delightful little novelty, which served materially to enhance the pleasure of the evening. It also secured the presence in the cast of Miss Gabrielle Ray, in the role of the much-talked-about Frou Frou. Two chances she afforded of distinguishing herself, and of both she makes the very best use. In the second act Miss Ray appears with Mr. W. H. Berry in a duet, entitled “Little Simpleton,” which is rounded off in unorthodox fashion by a dance. Miss Ray’s success was as emphatic as it was instantaneous. Anything more easy, more refined, or more fascinating than her movements could not be imagined. In her style there were touches that recalled those distant days when Kate Vaughan, young, lithe, exquisite, took the town by storm, moving the Gaiety “boys” to a frantic exhibition of enthusiasm. Her successor belongs, of course, to a more modern school, a school which, if we may so express ourselves, has just the merest suspicion of the gymnasium about it. How attractive it is, however, everyone knows. In thy third set of “The Merry Widow” Miss Ray has another “song and dance,” hardly so effective perhaps as the first one, but in this too she is seen to marked advantage. The applause showered upon the newcomer on both occasions showed how thoroughly the audience appreciated Mr. Edwardes’s latest happy thought. For the rest, if there is anything more refreshingly comic or inconsequentially droll than Mr. George Graves’s portrait the fatuous Baron Popoff we should be glad to learn of it. Nor does Mr. Graves stand alone, for to the feast of merriment Mr. W. H. Berry, Mr. Lennox Pawle, Mr. Fred Kaye, and Mr. William Spray contribute their full share. In the momentary absence of Miss Lily Elsie the title-part in “The Merry Widow” is now entrusted to Miss Gertrude Lester, the possessor of an exceptionally sympathetic and powerful voice and of acting talents of no mean order. Nor must the valuable assistance given by Mr. Robert Evett as Jolidon and by Mr. Joseph Coyne as Prince Danilo be forgotten.

 

The Daily Telegraph – Monday 9th September 1907

 

September 8, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Daly's Theatre, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, The Merry Widow, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gabrielle Ray – Lady Madcap – The Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News – Saturday 15th April 1905

September 8, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Gabrielle Ray, Lady Madcap, Social History, The Illustrated Sporting & Dramatic News, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Gladys Ray – Robinson Crusoe – The Era – Saturday 13th February 1897

AMUSEMENTS IN HASTINGS.

 (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT).

 GAIETY THEATRE. — Managing Director, Mr George Gaze. — Mr J. B. Mulholland’s successful pantomime Robinson Crusoe was brought here on Monday, and attracted a well-filled house. Miss Chummie La Mara sustained the title-role with marked ability, and secured rounds of applause for her songs. Mliss Eva Hamblyn as Polly Perkins acted prettily and sang pleasingly, though suffering from a slight hoarseness. Mr Charles Gardener was deservedly applauded for his clever business as Dame Crusoe. Mr Gus Wheatman gave a grotesquely humorous performance as Captain Spanker, whose mate, Jack Mainbrace, had a sprightly exponent in Miss Rose Hamilton. Mr George Fisk played with much energy as the Cannibal King. His daughter, the Princess, was pleasingly acted by Miss Lillie Comyns. Mr Joe Ellis was a good Man Friday. The Grovini Troupe are clever acrobats. Mr H. Mansfield as Vanderdecken was well appreciated for his singing. Miss Lily Twyman was a pleasing Fairy. Some good dancing was exhibited by the Misses Nita St. George, Lavurnan, Lily Piercy, Gladys Ray, Claire Tenson, Flo White, and Sisters Wilkinson. A strong and well-balanced chorus sang effectively. The scenery is very pretty, and the dresses and appointments harmonise well.

 

The Era – Saturday 13 February 1897

September 3, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Gabrielle Ray, Gladys Ray, Gladys Raymond, Pantomimes, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gladys Raymond – Aladdin – South London Chronicle – Friday 19 October 1906

CRYSTAL PALACE

PANTOMIME

It is welcome news to learn that Mr. Bannister Howard intends to revive old-fashioned pantomime at the Crystal Palace Theatre. That style of entertainment which has been called pantomime during the past few years has become rather boring, and has not been particularly amusing, either to grown-up people or children. Any effort, therefore, to return to the rollicking performances of bygone days deserves to be supported, and no doubt Mr. Howard’s enterprise will be crowned with success. The subject of the pantomime is the old favourite story of “Aladdin,” and in the hands of so experienced a pantomime writer as Mr. Fred Bowyer, great things may be expected. No expense is to be spared, and an excellent company has been secured. Miss Lillie Lassah will impersonate Aladdin; Miss Lillie Gallick; the Princess; Mr. Arthur Pool, Abanazar; Mr. A. E. Passmore, Widow Twankey; the Ongar Brothers, the Policemen and Speciality turn; Miss Nellie Barnwell; Second Boy; Miss Gladys Ray (a sister of Miss Gabrielle Ray, who was originally brought out by Mr. Howard), Second Girl; Miss Josephine Sullivan, a Fairy; and Mr. J. D. Cawdery, Demon and Clown, who will also work the traps. He was at one time with Conquest, and is one of the oldest trapworkers left. The Harlequinade and Shadow Pantomime will be a strong feature of the entertainment. The Pantomime will be produced by Mr. C. Lake, and Mr. Joseph Sainton will compose and arrange the music. Mr. W. E. Sharpe will still continue to actively manage the front of the theatre.

South London Chronicle – Friday 19th October 1906

Note; The review of Aladdin shows Miss Ray’s sister Gladys Raymond referred to as Gladys Ray rather than Gladys Raymond, I’m not sure whether this is a misprint or whether she performed under this name as well

August 24, 2017 Posted by | Actress, Aladdin, Gabrielle Ray, Gladys Ray, Gladys Raymond, Pantomimes, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment