Gabrielle Ray

'Gabrielle Ray said, 'I am always dancing; I love it! When I don't dance, I sing. What else is there to do?'

Aimee Webster – Hello! Morton – The Stage – Thursday 7th June 1917


 

THE LONDON COLISEUM.

 

“HELLO!  MORTON.”

 

On Monday, June 4, 1917, was produced here a revuette, compiled by Douglas Furber, entitled, “Hello! Morton.”

The many admirers of Leon Morton, the droll revue comedian from the Ambassadors, were disappointed at the London Coliseum on Monday afternoon. The piece in which he appears has been compiled by Douglas Furber from certain Harry Grattan-Walker Hackett episodes from the long string of revue successes at Charles B. Cochran’s cosy little theatre, but most of the business, it must be confessed, runs to something like seed in the auditorium of the St. Martin’s Lane house. Nor have the excerpts themselves been wisely chosen; it would be easy to name several other items from the Charles Cochran revues better suited to the general variety purposes of the French comedian. No doubt better selections will be made in due course, and, in view of other surroundings, a proper disregard exercised in regard to the theatre intime atmosphere in which most of them have been conceived. The present business shows Morton being used as a war map, a device which has already lost its novelty; as the would-be reciter, with interruptions of a dramatic poem; and as the Highland soldier in the wordless episode called “A Highland Soldier’s Dream.” In each item he has the assistance of Douglas Furber, James M. Campbell, Sylvia Dancourt, and a company of ladies including Peggy Connor, Dolly Cullin, Joan Emney, Mona Fraser, Ann Furrell, Aimee Webster, Kathleen Maude, Irene Russell, Siddons Saharet, Ena Strange, Maisie Walsh, and Evelyn Wells.

George Graves’s sketch, “What a Lady!” has wisely benefited by criticism, the result being a succession of laughs. Myra Kenham now plays the part originated by Winifred Wing. Mabel Mann’s resonant contralto is well suited to the house; and warm hearted applause greets the musical interlude by Julien Henry and company, although its dialogue, which is weak, should be discarded. Bruett, the French poilu, sings in French and English, is a great favourite for a most acceptable act, his Entente cordiale business with a British Tommy being not the least attractive feature of a thoroughly attractive and topical turn. Other items on the programme are by the Five Jovers, in an acrobatic act; Jack Pleasants, the shy comedian; Grock, the inimitable French clown; Coram, an established favourite;  and Dainty Doris, a charming comedienne and graceful dancer, who should figure more frequently in the West End bills.

 

The Stage – Thursday 7th June 1917

September 15, 2020 - Posted by | Actress, Amy Webster, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, The Stage, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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