Gabrielle Ray

'Gabrielle Ray said, 'I am always dancing; I love it! When I don't dance, I sing. What else is there to do?'

A Girl on the Stage – Morning Post – Monday 7th May 1906


 

 

PRINCE OF WALES’ THEATRE.

 

“A GIRL ON THE STAGE.”

A Musical Play in Three Acts, founded on “The Little Cherub.”

 

Mr. George has accustomed the play going public to second editions of his musical comedies which have little left of the originals save the framework, but they have been invariably brought out at the end of long runs when the and dances and incidents which once pleased had become stale through repetition. It is a new departure for him to adopt such methods to a piece which is still at the beginning its career if  judged the usual runs of Mr. Edwardes’s musical pieces, but this is what he has done with “The Little Cherub,” for “A Girl on the Stage” cannot any stretch of imagination be called a new production. The plot, no doubt, has been altered somewhat, and the alteration is a decided improvement. Molly Montrose, the actress, is now really in love with Lord Congress, the Earl of Sanctobury’s son, a new character, who returns her love, and her rather pronounced flirtation with the old Earl has the laudable purpose in view of getting his consent to their marriage. The whole play is made pleasanter in consequence, and even the supper scene in the second act, if still a trifle wearisome and stagey, does not jar as it did in, places the first night. But the plot, everyone knows, is not of prime importance in musical comedies, and most of the scenes and the chief  incidents followed one another on Saturday night very much in the order of their original setting, although a careful discrimination has been used, and where alterations or additions have been made they have been almost invariably improvements.

A dozen new numbers have been added to the score, six of which are from the pen Mr. Ivan Caryll. Three of these occur in the first act, and all were received with favour. The most successful was perhaps one entitled “Rather Nice,” which was sung with great charm by Miss Ruth Vincent, who now plays the part of Molly Montrose. It was followed by a very pleasing dance executed by her with a delicacy and grace which made beautiful the simplest movements. A new duet “Love in a Cottage,” in which she shared honours with another newcomer, Mr. Lionel Mackinder, who plays the part of the newly-discovered son of Lord Sanctobury, was also enthusiastically received. Miss Vincent has not been seen London since she achieved such remarkable success “Veronique” and her reception was of the warmest and most friendly description. A delicacy and refinement of acting made her overtures to the old Earl appear quite charming, and much of the success of the performance Saturday evening must be placed to her credit. Mr. Willie Edonin has not quite warmed to his work as the new Earl of Sanctobury, but all parts grow in his hands, and it may safely be prophesied that he will be the life of the piece far as its comedy concerned before long. He is always particularly good in the little scenes byplay, backwaters the main stream, which he seems to create for himself, and some of these were received on Saturday with the heartiest favour. Many of the old favourites remain, among them Mr. G. Carroll, who was as droll as ever. His dance with Miss Doris Dene was one of the successes of the evening. Miss Zena Dare and that delightful dancer Miss Gabrielle Ray, who has deserted the Gaiety for the Prince of Wales’, made the most of their parts, and Mr. W. H. Berry was excellent as Lord Sanctobury’s valet.

Mr. Edwardes stands alone as regards stage decoration, but has surely beaten his own record the exquisite “Cupid and Pierrot” scone in the third act. He has made a daring experiment building his new piece on “The Little Cherub,” but if may judge its reception on Saturday night will be successful one.

Morning Post – Monday 7th May 1906

 

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January 27, 2019 - Posted by | A Girl on the Stage, Actress, Amy Webster, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , ,

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