Gabrielle Ray

'Gabrielle Ray said, 'I am always dancing; I love it! When I don't dance, I sing. What else is there to do?'

Gabrielle Ray – Little Red Riding Hood – Daily Telegraph & Courier (London) – Friday 26th December 1902

LYRIC, HAMMERSMITH.

 

If the residents of Hammersmith are at all dissatisfied with the Yuletide entertainment provided for them they must be extremely difficult to please. Mr. Acton Phillips, who has received the warm congratulations of his theatrical friends upon attaining the mayoral dignity in the riverside borough, presented his twelfth annual pantomime to a large and enthusiastic audience at the Lyric Opera House on Christmas Eve. It was an artistic production, full of glow and colour, and promises to be as bright and exhilarating as any of its predecessors. Upon Red Riding Hood the Broadway management rely for inspiration on the present occasion, and Mr. Brian Daly and Mr. John M. East, experienced hands at this class of work, have furnished a “book” which deftly mingles the traditional story with topics of the moment, and supplies numberless stage pictures of considerable effectiveness and beauty. The topical allusions were apt and up-to-date, and the local hits in particular were instantly caught up by the audience, evoking the heartiest merriment. Imperial politics were, of course, touched upon, and the spectators cheered to the echo the references to Mr. Chamberlain and his mission to South Africa, as well as to the plight of our gallant Reservists. When one the characters exclaimed, “That’s the way we treat our heroes!” the applause demonstrated where the sympathy of the audience lay. The subject of Red Riding Hood lends itself to generous stage treatment, but, besides being tastefully mounted, the pantomime was capitally interpreted by a band of capable artists. Miss Gabrielle Ray proved a dainty and sprightly heroine, and at once captivated all hearts by her singing and dancing. Her honours, however, were fairly by Mr Gracie Whiteford, who brilliantly sustained the part of Prince Sylvanus. To say nothing of a comedy presence, Miss Whiteford possesses a charming voice, and knows how to use it; and it may be justly declared that between them these young ladies did much to secure unqualified excess for the Lyric pantomime. Miss Edwards and Miss Lucia Edwards were acceptable as Bo-Peep and Boy Blue. Among the mole characters the palm was carried off by Mr. Harry Buss. Dame Hood is a part which requires judicious handling, and the acting of her impersonator was humorous and in good taste throughout. Mr. John Gourlay ran him close with an admirable portrayal of the Baron de Lupus, “a bold, bad man, who changes to a wolf on the slightest provocation.” Messers Baroux and Bion were knockabouts who created endless amusement by their antics, while the facial contortions of Mr. Arthur Watts as Simple Simon were something to be remembered. Among the “selected spirits” who did real service were Miss Vera Schlesinger as the Fairy of Progress, and Mr. George Traverner as the Demon. A doll dance by the Olive Trio was undoubtedly one of the features of the evening, but it was quite equalled, if not actually surpassed, by a Dense Japonaise in the Bat Masque at the Royal Palace to celebrate the union of the hero and heroine. This, in accordance with pantomime law, led the way to the transformation scene, entitled “The Four Elements – Earth. Air, Fire, and Water,” which deservedly won the admiration of the house.  “Red Riding Hood,” in fact, starts upon her journey at Hammersmith with the fairest hopes.

 

Daily Telegraph & Courier (London) – Friday 26th December 1902

 

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March 16, 2018 Posted by | Actress, Gabrielle Ray, Little Red Riding Hood, Pantomimes, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment