Gabrielle Ray

'Gabrielle Ray said, 'I am always dancing; I love it! When I don't dance, I sing. What else is there to do?'

Gabrielle Ray (Rotary M.14.F)

Gabrielle Ray (Rotary M.14.F) 1910

January 31, 2014 Posted by | Actress, Deltiology, Gabrielle Ray, Rotary, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gabrielle Ray (Rotary 11728 B)

Gabrielle Ray (Rotary 11728 B) 1911

January 31, 2014 Posted by | Actress, Deltiology, Gabrielle Ray, Rotary, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Daly’s Theatre – The News – 1937

Daly's Theatre - The News - Thursday 23rd September 1937

 

Dear old Daly’s Theatre in London, home of half the world’s best musical comedies, is being pulled down to make a super cinema costing £250,000 for Warner Bros., American film magnates. Sons of a poor Polish shoemaker who emigrated to America with his wife and eldest boy, their film interests today are worth millions. They are the men who brought talkies into being. The brothers opened their first theatre in Newcastle. U.S.A. in 1903. Albert took tickets at the door; Sam (now dead) ran the machine: and Jack rendered the illustrated songs in a shrill soprano; while Harry, always the leader, supervised the operation of the modest enterprise. The chairs were borrowed from an under taker next door; when there was a funeral the picture patrons had to stand up. Not since the gay 1903’s have Harry, Albert, and Jack Warner been out of the film business.

In 1918, Jack, who had been studying methods of film making in Hollywood, and had begun to find that production was his true field, took an active part in the artistic direction of Mv Four Years in Germany, while brother Albert applied high-pressure methods and sold the film before it was even completed.

That picture was the first to really set the far-sighted brothers on their feet upon the high road to success. With the proceeds from the Ambassador Gerard film, the brothers descended upon Hollywood, where they bought a vacant lot with a wooden shed thereafter proudly referred to as the studio. Next they secured the rights of successful stories and plays. They were the first to pay large sums for such material.

Suddenly the Western Electric Co. perfected an odd-looking device on which they had been working quietly for nine years. It was offered to most of the producing companies. Scornfully they rejected it. “Talking motion pictures,” they said. “Nothing in them; people don’t  want their movies to talk.”

In a week the Warners owned a controlling right in Vitaphone, the first practical device for the synchronisation of sound and motion pictures. Most of Hollywood’s “big guns” sat back with tolerant amusement and watched the Warners make Don Juan with John Barrymore and a full accompaniment by the New York Symphony Orchestra. Then came the premiere of Jazz Singer, and Warner Bros. became a power in the industry. Warner Week opens in Adelaide on Saturday with Green Light, at the Regent and Mountain Justice at the York.

Now their ramifications include radio, music publishing, and even the operation of one of America’s largest printing establishments. But with all their success, the Warners are still working and saving. They could dispose of their interests for millions, but they are not going to, because, to use the words of Jack Warner – “pictures are their racket.”

 

January 30, 2014 Posted by | Actress, Daly's Theatre, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Daly’s Theatre – The Advertiser (Adelaide) – 1937

Daly's Theatre - The Advertiser (Adelaide) - Saturday 16th october 1937

Tonight, Daly’s Theatre will lower its curtain for the last time, appropriately enough on the final performance of “The First Legion.” What a legion of memories are associated with it notably in musical comedy, best known of all “The Geisha,” which had its premiere there in 1896. Daly’s, like many other theatres in the West End, is to be swathed in celluloid – it is to become a cinema. An American play wright, John Augustin Daly, opened the first Daly’s in New York, and achieved such an instant success that he determined to have a Daly’s in London. He died six years after it was opened in June, 1833. Another American enterprise, Warner Brothers, will build on the site the Warner Theatre, and, though they have sent to London their head American designer, the cinema will be designed by a London architect, Mr. Edward A. Stone, who has already won a big name as an original thinker. He has 12,000 square, feet of space on which to plot, yet such is the urge to give patrons room and comfort, that the theatre will seat only 2.000 people. There will be only one tier, and the stage will be a miniature affair, by comparison with its predecessor, suitable only for mountings incidental to the films presented. Warner Brothers plan to have the theatre completed in seven months after the clearing of the site.

 

 

January 29, 2014 Posted by | Actress, Daly's Theatre, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Daly’s Theatre – The Advertiser (Adelaide) – 1937

Daly's Theatre - The Advertiser (Adelaide) - Tuesday 26th August 1937

 

London loses its old theatres.

 London is always changing and Leicester Square associated, as it is with the old Empire, the Alhambra and Daly’s Theatre changes most of all. Soon we shall have to take, down Shakespeare’s statue, and substitute the effigy of some American magnate of the cinemas. The Alhambra has already been reduced to a mass of rubble, and Daly’s Theatre will be the next to come down.

They put on a new play there last week — a play announced to be “positively the last.” A very good play it is, and well acted. But what a contrast to the traditional musical comedy of the old Daly’s. All the actors are men, the play itself deals with a religious theme, and we actually had the Bishop of London in the stage box on the opening night

 

January 29, 2014 Posted by | Actress, Daly's Theatre, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Merry Widow (Rotary 11420 V)

Gabrielle Ray as “Frou Frou” in “The Merry Widow” 1907 (Rotary 11420 V)

January 29, 2014 Posted by | Actress, Deltiology, Gabrielle Ray, Rotary, Social History, The Merry Widow, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Merry Widow – Sheet Music – 1907

The Merry Widow - Sheet Music - 1907

January 28, 2014 Posted by | Actress, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, The Merry Widow, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Merry Widow – Cecil Beaton – 1937

Reference:

Beaton, Cecil; (1937) “Cecil Beaton’s Scrapbook,” Scribner’s, New York (p 50 – 52 accessed 28/01/2014, Hathi Trust)

January 28, 2014 Posted by | Actress, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, The Merry Widow, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Beautiful Women By Adrianne Allen – The Evening Post – 1936

Beautiful Women By Adrianne Allen - The Evening Post 18th June 1936

January 26, 2014 Posted by | Actress, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, Uncategorized | , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Little Cherub – The Sketch – 1906

The Little Cherub - The Sketch - 7th February 1906

January 21, 2014 Posted by | Actress, Cherub, Gabrielle Ray, Social History, The Little Cherub, The Sketch, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment